Advice

Preparing Yourself and Your Child For Braces.

To achieve a great smile that will be part of your life forever, we will need your full cooperation both at home and at the practice.

Scroll down to read more about the tips and tricks!

 

Advice

Preparing Yourself and Your Child For Braces.

To achieve a great smile that will be part of your life forever, we will need your full cooperation both at home and at the practice.

Scroll down to read more about the tips and tricks!

 
Advice

Tell them what to expect…

Be honest about the braces and tell your child and tell them what to expect. They may have friends with braces so they might already know that it is uncomfortable in the beginning or may be sensitive for a day or two after an appointment. Let them know about the food restrictions, oral hygiene and mouthguard protection for contact sport.

Advice

Braces are a commitment…

Commitment to keep appointments, oral hygiene, foods that are not allowed and to wear appliances as prescribed. Give them the opportunity to ask lots of questions, express their concerns, and better understand the commitment.

Helping Hand…

Let your child know that you care, want to help where possible and will always be there to help. Especially in the beginning, when everything is unfamiliar to them, take time and prepare yourself to be the “hands on” parent  helping put wax on or to bend an irritating wire or help to floss!

Advice

Food Options…

DO NOT complain about any food adjustments you have to make as a family because of them having braces. This will let them feel insecure. Please do not give the rest of the family any treats that the one with braces cannot have too, and try not to keep any tempting treats in your home.

Advice

Your Effort…

Finally with your cooperation, time management for the appointments, food preparations and good communication with us, we all can make this experience a good one for your child. Let them see the long term result; the curve that sets everything straight, their beautiful smile!

Advice

Remember…

Teeth become sore when they move, this is normal and usually only lasts a few days. Adapting to orthodontic treatment can be physically as well as emotionally challenging, and the patient may experience pain for several days. The degree of soreness will differ in each person, and it is advisable to take whatever one will normally take for a headache.

The First Few Days

For children patients, use any non-prescription medication (preferably syrup) you would usually use in your household associated with pain and fever.  For the relief of mild to moderate pain, paracetamol and ibuprofen are both effective analgesics. It is always advisable to contact your pharmacist who can perform a valuable service to ensure the appropriate use of medicine if you have any concerns. It is, however, crucial that the patient start eating as soon as possible.  Chewing soft, sugar-free chewing gum or eating a grated apple will improve blood circulation to the muscles and ligaments around the teeth and lessens sensitivity.

For discomfort in the jaws use a heating pad or warm face cloth.

Your sympathetic approach may help the patient to adapt sooner to the treatment!

Mouth Sores

Unfortunately, mouth sores may develop if chafing occur on the inside of the mouth and to ease the discomfort, a small piece of sticky orthodontic wax can be placed on the irritating area over the bracket.  For the best result attempt to dry the area and warm the wax by rubbing it between your fingers before application.  A piece of damp cotton wool on the area is another option.

 

The problem may be solved by rinsing the mouth with the following mixture:

One tablespoon salt
One teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
Glass of lukewarm water
Rinse for a minute twice a day.

Videos

Watch the videos below for more insight into orthodontic care and treatment!

 

Courtesy of Ortho2Systems